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Campus Briefs

By Cyndy Cole and
Arizona Summer Wildcat
Wednesday July 10, 2002

Medicine Dean Resigns

UA College of Medicine Dean Bill Dalton resigned yesterday, after seven months as dean, to become director and CEO of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute at the University of South Florida.

Moffit is the third-largest cancer hospital in the United States.

Dalton will begin work in Florida on Aug. 1.

Dalton said it was not his intention to leave the UA College of Medicine, but that he couldn‚t pass up the opportunity to „really make a difference in the war against cancer.š

Dalton played a significant role in the successful effort to attract Dr. Jeffrey Trent and the International Genomics Consortium to Arizona. He also launched an effort to establish a $2 million cooperative research program to develop clinical diagnostic and treatment programs.

UA Scientists map bacterium gene

It‚s called „genome annotation,š and this week will be the first time a whole genome will be mapped out, analyzed and genetic data stored in public databases from the UA.

Two UA scientists have sequenced a common microbe that fixes nitrogen to plants, in a research project in Walnut Creek, Calif.

This week scientists from nine institutions in five countries are flying to UA help analyze and input the data from Azotobacter vinelandii, a bacteria commonly found in soil into a computer database.

Mapping the bacterium meant sequencing 4,800 genomes, one-tenth of the number found in the human genome, Christina Kennedy, a microbiologist of the UA plant pathology department, stated in a press release.

The data from the A. vinelandii project will allow scientists to make comparisons with genomes of other organisms that they could not make before.

„By having the sequence of every gene in A. vinelandii, we will know the sequence of every protein,š Kennedy stated. „We will then recognize the appearance of new genes we hadn‚t known before, with new functions related to nitrogen, carbon and energy metabolism.š

UA Scientists, map bacterium gene for the first time

It‚s called „genome annotation,š and this week will be the first time a whole genome will be mapped out, analyzed and genetic data stored in public databases from the UA.

Two UA scientists have sequenced a common microbe that fixes nitrogen to plants, in a research project in Walnut Creek, Calif.

This week scientists from nine institutions in five countries are flying to UA help analyze and input the data from Azotobacter vinelandii, a bacteria commonly found in soil into a computer database.

Mapping the bacterium meant sequencing 4,800 genomes, one-tenth of the number found in the human genome, Christina Kennedy, a microbiologist of the UA plant pathology department, stated in a press release.

The data from the A. vinelandii project will allow scientists to make comparisons with genomes of other organisms that they could not make before.

„By having the sequence of every gene in A. vinelandii, we will know the sequence of every protein,š Kennedy stated. „We will then recognize the appearance of new genes we hadn‚t known before, with new functions related to nitrogen, carbon and energy metabolism.š

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