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Gas prices on the decline


Photo
Jake Lacey/Arizona Daily Wildcat
A man fills up his truck at the Circle K on North Park Avenue and East Speedway Boulevard. Gas prices are on their way back down.
By Nick Smith
Arizona Daily Wildcat
Tuesday, November 1, 2005
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The average price for a gallon of unleaded gasoline in Tucson has dropped nearly 30 cents in the past month and may continue to decline, sources said.

Tucson set a record for gas prices on Sept. 9 with a gallon going for an average of $3.06. Today, the average price for a gallon of unleaded gas at stations near campus is $2.51.

Students said they are pleased with the current trend in declining gas prices.

"They're going down and I'm excited," said Kristen Briney, a pre-business sophomore.

High gasoline prices had forced Briney to alter her driving habits.

"I made my friends drive," she said.

Although gas prices in Arizona are on the decline, they still rank above the national average of $2.49 per gallon, according to figures provided by David Cowley, public affairs manager for AAA Arizona.

The average price in Tucson as of yesterday was $2.58.

The decline in gas prices can be attributed to oil refineries returning to operation after being knocked out by the recent hurricanes, Cowley said.

Gas prices are also low because the demand for gasoline has been low in response to previously high gas prices.

"We have seen demand drop about 1.5 percent from the last year," Cowley said. "This is unheard of."

Michael Troughton, a public management senior, said gas prices are still too high.

"Prices have come down in the past three weeks, but they're still ridiculous," Troughton said. "I still have to drive to work and school."

Jennifer Avila, a junior majoring in molecular and cellular biology, said the cost of gas is still hurting her pocketbook.

"I'm kind of running out of money," Avila said. "I think it's horrible that it takes $30 to fill up my small car."

Other students like Rachel Matlin, a psychology sophomore, feel there is no way to get around high gas prices.

"Because public transportation is so bad, you have to (drive)," she said. "We need a new system."



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