Arizona Daily Wildcat Online
sections
Front Page
News
Opinions
Sports
Go Wild
Live Culture
Police Beat
Datebook
Comics
Crossword
Special Sections
Photo Spreads
Classifieds
The Wildcat
Letter to the Editor
Wildcat Staff
Search
Archives
Job Openings
Advertising Info
Student Media
Arizona Student Media Info
UATV -
Student TV
 
KAMP -
Student Radio
The Desert Yearbook
Daily Wildcat Staff Alumni

Pell Grants lose some federal support


Photo
Claire C. Laurence/Arizona Daily Wildcat
Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl walks through his tour of the UA in April. Kyl denied $384 million in Pell Grant funds last week that would have been distributed to financially eligible college students across the nation.
By Nicole Santa Cruz
Arizona Daily Wildcat
Wednesday, November 2, 2005
Print this

Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., voted last week to deny an amendment to a bill that would have provided $836 million to be used for Pell Grants, officials said.

The amendment would have given Arizona students an additional $250 on average, according to a press release.

At the UA, about 7,000 students receive Pell Grants, which translates into $18 million in grant money, said John Nametz, director of student financial aid.

President Peter Likins said Pell Grants have decreased in value dramatically in recent decades, and that it's always disappointing when anyone in Congress votes against the Pell Grant increases.

"It's a sad thing and it's frustrating for us," Likins said.

The Pell Grant is vital to education in Arizona because there is a lack of state financial support, Nametz said, and if the Pell Grant's maximum amount is not increased over time, talented students could miss out on the opportunity to attend a university.

"It is the Pell Grant and other institutions that are helping needy students," Nametz said. "It's bigger than the money."

Hank Kenski, regional director for Sen. Jon Kyl, said approving the amendment would require a budget waiver, which would have increased the federal deficit.

"In that context, the senator voted no," Kenski said.

Kenski said Kyl is not against spending for higher education and both Sens. Jon Kyl and John McCain, R-Ariz., have fought to increase Pell Grants in the past.

Nametz said the federal Pell Grant is based on a student's financial need and is the largest federal grant program in the U.S.

"My guess is a lot of students wouldn't be here if not for the Pell Grant," Nametz said.

Ana Ayala, a Mexican-American studies senior, said she has received the Pell Grant throughout her entire college career and it has relieved her financial stress.

"It helps a lot because it's free money." Ayala said. "You don't have to worry about returning all those funds."

Doshia Davis, a junior majoring in women's studies and media arts, said the Pell Grant has helped her cut back on the amount of money she has had to come up with for school because she pays her own tuition and living expenses.

The Pell Grant usually covers most of her tuition, so all she has to worry about are her bills, rent and books, Davis said.

"It leaves you the choice so you don't have to work as much," Davis said.

Even though Davis said she feels the grant has helped her with college, she also believes the maximum Pell Grant award of $4,050 should be increased because it doesn't even cover her tuition because of recent increases.

"Every little bit helps," Davis said.



Write a Letter to the Editor
articles
Students hurt in brawl
divider
UA climbs out of $43.6M hole caused by state
divider
Pell Grants lose some federal support
divider
Grant to fund water security system
divider
Retention plan puts UA on top
divider
Five-Year Budget Timeline
divider
Quick Hits
divider
Fast Facts
divider
Police Beat
divider
Datebook
divider
Restaurant and Bar Guide
Housing Guide
Search for:
advanced search Archives

NEWS | SPORTS | OPINIONS | GO WILD
CLASSIFIEDS | ARCHIVES | CONTACT US | SEARCH



Webmaster - webmaster@wildcat.arizona.edu
Copyright 2005 - The Arizona Daily Wildcat - Arizona Student Media