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Arizona Summer Wildcat
Wednesday July 9, 2003

28 Days Later

A lot of people will leave "28 Days Later" and have nightmares about being attacked by zombie-like creatures; it is definitely graphic enough. But this movie is more than just a thriller. Like Danny Boyle's other films "Trainspotting" and "The Beach," it is a reflection on human nature, a societal commentary.

The premise of the movie: The hero (an Irish newcomer named Cillian Murphy, who will probably stir things up like Ewan MacGregor did after "Trainspotting") wakes up after 28 days in a coma to find the whole of England depopulated, the result of a disastrous plague that infects people with ╬rage.'

The movie reflects on the fine line between sanity and madness ¸ a distinction that is well illustrated with unique cinematography. Madness, shown with grainy 80's-style shots, contrasts with sharp, vibrant colors: Reality. Visually, this film is amazing.

The coolest part is that the director somehow managed to empty out entire blocks of London, and it is a really spooky thing to see London totally empty. They may have done this digitally, but I don't know if they had the budget to do that.

This movie should be a pleaser for people who like a good horror flick, but it is also a way deeper shock to your core than a Freddy Krueger movie.

¸ Cara O'Connor


Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines

For die-hard fans of the "Terminator" series (dating back to around the time when most of us were born), "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines" will be a thrill. For those not so enamored with the first two, T-3 will most likely be only satisfactory (more so for the price of a matinee ticket).

Unlike the first two Terminator installments, T-3 is directed by Jonathan Mostow ("U-571, Breakdown"). Mostow's style differs from director of T-1 and T-2, James Cameron, in that every moment is meant to be intense, rather than the "build-up, calm-down" feel that Cameron provided.

Of course, Arnold Schwarzenegger returns in T-3 ÷÷ as a good guy for the second straight "Terminator" film. Although Arnold's heart seems to be less into this one than the prior two, he gives another entertaining ÷÷ and often comical ÷÷ performance.

To not give too much away, T-3 will definitely leave most viewers with an unexpected feeling as they leave the theater. Lets put it this way: Terminator 4 and 5 are not likely far behind.

¸ Shane Dale


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